ECOLEC welcomes EU common charger initiative to reduce e-waste

ECOLEC valora positivamente el impulso europeo al cargador común para reducir la generación de RAEE

The initiative to establish a common charger for electrical and electronic devices is the first step in the introduction of new legislation in this area. It will reduce the production of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE)because new devices acquired will not automatically come with a corresponding charger. The new legislation will drive the Circular Economy model, reduce production costs and facilitate consumer purchasing decisions. The initiative will be debated in the plenary sitting of the European Parliament in May, with the aim of making technologies interoperable by 2026.

On Thursday last, the European Parliament’s Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee adopted a favourable position on the initiative to establish a common charger for electrical and electronic devices. This is the first step in the introduction of new legislation in this area. It will reduce e-waste production because new devices acquired will not automatically come with a corresponding charger. The Fundación ECOLEC welcomes this initiative and believes it to be a key element in the correct management of this type of waste and the promotion of the Circular Economy model in the European Union. 

“European Parliament estimates indicate that around 500 million chargers come into Europe every year, generating between 11,000 and 13,000 tonnes of WEEE. This initiative will reduce production costs, boost reuse and, of course, promote the circular model, which is key to achieving the goals of the European Green Deal. This model enables the components of end-of-life devices to be reused in the production of new appliances,” said Rafael Serrano, Director of Institutional Relations, Marketing and Communication at the Fundación Ecolec.

The European Parliament has stated that all electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets, consoles and cameras, will have to feature a USB-C port, regardless of the manufacturer. Only devices that are too small to have this type of port (smartwatches, some sports equipment and certain medical devices) will be exempt from the regulation.